Thakur and Kaur: Pre-experimental study to see the effectiveness of teaching module regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever amongst the students


Introduction

Mosquitoes are the non-arthropod flies and the member of nematode flies. Mosquitoes are a vector agent for a number of infectious diseases.1, 2 One of the common infectious diseases is caused by mosquito bite and it is more prevalent in the world named as chikungunya.3 The main clinical manifestations of this disease is stooped appearance, joint pain and fever. Its Incubation period is 3-12 days It is diagnosed by blood test, serological test and ELISA.4 Chikungunya can be treated symptomatically.

Analgesic and NSAIDS medication may be used to reduce the pain and swelling. There is no approved vaccine for this virus.5 Thus prevention depend upon prevention of mosquito bites which transmit it.6 People can prevent mosquitoes by wearing clothing that covers the skin, using mosquito net, application of insect repellent.

Objective

To find out effectiveness of teaching module on knowledge of students regarding Chickengunya fever.

Materials and Methods

A pre-experimental study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of teaching module on knowledge regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever amongst the students of 9th standard in selected schools of Ludhiana, Punjab. The study was conducted after getting ethical clearance from the ethical committee. Data was collected in the month of February-march 2017. The sample of the study was 60 students of 9th standard. Tool was divided into three parts demographic variables i.e. Age, Religion, Habitat, Education of Father, Education of Mother Secondly Structured questionnaire with 20 items, and teaching module regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever which was given after pre-test. Purposive sampling technique was used in the study. Analaysis of data was done to assess the pre-test and post-test knowledge score of the students. To find out association between pre and post-test knowledge scores with selected socio-demographic variables. The data was analyse by calculation the score in term of mean, standard deviation (SD), frequency, percentage, paired ‘t’ test and ‘ANOVA’ test.

Table 1

Socio-demographicprofile of the studentsN-60

S. No

Characteristics

Frequency (%)

1.

Age

a. 13-14 years

25(41.67%)

b. 15-16 years

35(58.33%)

4.

Religion

a. Hindu

12(20%)

b. Muslim

-

c. Sikh

46(76.67%)

d. Christian

-

e. other

2(3.33%)

3.

Habitat

a. Rural

56(93.33%)

b. Urban

04(6.67%)

4.

Education of Father

04(6.67%)

a. Illiterate

10(16.66%)

b. Primary Education

18(30%)

c. Matriculation

21(35%)

d. Secondary Education

07(11.67%)

e. Graduation & Above

5.

Education of Mother

a. Illiterate

10(16.66%)

b. Primary Education

16(26.67%)

c. Matriculation

16(26.67%)

d. Secondary Education

13((21.67%)

e. Graduation & Above

05(8.33%)

6.

Source of Information

a. T.V or Radio

19(31.67%)

b. Friends/Family

08(13.33%)

c. Newspaper & Magazine

21(35%)

d. Internet

12(20%)

Majority (58.33%) of 9th standard students were in the age group of 15-16 years, followed by (41.67%) in the age group of 13-14 years.Majority (76.67%) of 9th standard students were from Sikh religion, followed by (20.00%) from the Hindu and least (3.33%) were from the other religions.

As per residential area majority of the students (93.33%) were from rural area followed by (6.67%) lives in urban area.

In terms of educational status of father majority of respondents (35.00%) had secondary education, followed by (30.00%) have matriculation, followed by (16.66%) have primary education, followed by (11.67%) have graduation or above, followed by (6.67%) illiterate.

In terms of educational status of mother majority of respondents (26.67%) had primary education and matriculation followed by (21.67%) have secondary education, followed by (16.66%) illiterate, followed by (8.33%) have graduation or above education.

Maximum number (35.00%) of had information from newspaper and magazine, followed by (31.67%) from T.V or Radio, followed by (20.00%) from internet, followed by (13.33%) from the friends/family.

Table 2

Pre-test knowledge score of the study subjects Pre-test N-60

Criterion measure

Score

N(%)

Good

14-20

2(3.33%)

Average

7-13

55(91.67%)

Poor

0-6

3(5%)

The above table reveals that maximum number of students 91% had average knowledge, 5% had poor knowledge and 3% had good knowledge regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever.

Table 3

Post-test knowledge score the study Post-test, N=60

Criterion Measure

Score

Frequency

Good

14-20

49(81.67%)

Average

7-13

11(18.33%)

Poor

0-6

-

Table 3 Reveals that in post-test maximum 81% of students gained good knowledge and 18% had average knowledge regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever.

Thus it shows that there was increase in the knowledge of students regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever.

Table 4

Pretest and post-test knowledge score of the study subjects. N=60

Group

N

Mean

SD

df

‘t’

Pre-Test

60

9.71

±2.30

118

14.17

Post-Test

60

15.20

±1.91

118

14.17

The above table shows the effectiveness of pre-test and post-test mean score among students regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever. Pre-test mean score was 9.71, however post- test mean score was 15.20. The difference between the Pre-test and Post-test mean score was statistically significant at P=0.05 level.

Hence, it shows that structured teaching programme was effective to increase the level of knowledge among students regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever.

Table 5

Association between pre and post-test knowledge scores

Pre -Test

Post -Test

Characteristics

Frequency

Mean±SD

Test value

Mean±SD

Test value

df

Age

13-14 years

25

9.68 ± 2.52

0.10NS

15.08±1.77

0.40NS

58

15-16 years

35

9.74 ± 2.17

15.28±2.00

Religion

Hindu

12

8.75±1.86

14.16±1.69

2

Sikh

46

10.28±2.51

F=2.99*

15.52±1.85

F=2.98*

57

Other

02

7.50±0.17

14.00 ± 2.82

Habitat

Rural

56

9.85±2.33

1.33NS

15.35±1.83

1.33NS

58

Urban

04

8.25±2.06

13.00±1.82

Education of Father

Illiterate

04

6.75±0.50

14.25±1.50

Primary Education

10

9.20±2.39

15.60±1.90

4

Matriculation

18

10.66±2.22

F=3.56*

15.50±1.72

F=0.52NS

55

Secondary Education

21

9.33±2.08

15.00±1.81

Graduation & Above

07

11.00±2.64

15.00±2.88

Education of Mother

Illiterate

10

7.30±0.67

13.90±1.66

Primary Education

16

10.25±2.23

15.68±2.24

4

Matriculation

16

10.25±2.62

15.87±1.54

55

Secondary Education

13

9.69±1.79

F=4.79*

15.15±1.90

F=2.09*

Graduation & Above

05

11.40±1.81

14.80±1.48

Source of Information

T.V or Radio

19

9.94±2.41

15.15±1.77

Friends/Family

08

10.2±3.22

15.12±1.45

3

Newspaper & Magazine

21

9.23±2.02

F=0.46NS

15.23±2.22

F=0.02NS

56

Internet

12

9.91±2.06

15.33±1.96

Majority of the respondents (58.33%) were in the age group of 15-16 years followed by (41.67%) in the age group of 13-14 years.

The majority of the respondents (76.67%) were from Sikh religion followed by (20%) from the Hindu and least (3.33%) were from the other religions.

The majority of respondents in pre-test score were (91.67%) in 7-13 i.e. average, in 0-6 (5%) poor and (3.33%) in 14-20 i.e good. Whereas, in post test score the majority of the respondents were (81.67%) in 14-20 score i.e good and (18.33%) in 7-13 score i.e average and no one were scoring 0-6 i.e Poor. It concludes that post-test knowledge score is higher than pre-test knowledge score. Therefore, the structured teaching programme was effective in enhancing the knowledge of senior secondary schools students of 9th standard. Majority of the students (58.33%) were in the age group of 15-16 years followed by (41.67%) in the age group of 13-14 years. Majority of the students (76.67%) were from Sikh religion followed by (20%) from the Hindu and least (3.33%) were from the other religions.

As per residential area majority of the respondents (93.33%) live in rural area followed by (6.67%) lives in urban area.In terms of educational status of father majority of respondents (35%) have secondary education, followed by (30%) have matriculation, followed by (16.66%) have primary education, followed by (11.67%) have graduation or above, followed by (6.67%) illiterate. In terms of educational status of mother majority of respondents (26.67%) have primary education and matriculation followed by (21.67%) have secondary education, followed by (16.66%) illiterate, followed by (8.33%) have graduation or above education. Maximum number of students (35%) had information from newspaper and magazine followed by (31.67%) from T.V or Radio, followed by (20%) from internet, followed by (13.33%) from the friends/family.

In this group the majority of the students score in pre-test were (91.67%) in 7-13 average, (5%) in 0-6 poor and (3.33%) in 14-20 good knowledge score. Whereas in post-test score reveals that maximum (81.67%) in 14-20 good knowledge and (18.33%) in 7-13 average and no one were in scoring 0-6 poor. It concludes that post-test knowledge score is higher than pre-test knowledge score. Therefore, the structured teaching programme was effective in enhancing the the knowledge of 9th standard students, Ludhiana, Punjab.

In comparison pre and post test mean knowledge score, Pre-test mean score was 9.71, however post-test mean score was 15.20. The difference between the Pre-test and Post-test mean technique score was statistically significant at P=0.05 level. Hence, it shows that structured teaching programme was effective to increase the level of knowledge among students regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever.

As per association with demographic variables pre-test mean knowledge score was 9.74 obtained from subjects in age group 15-16 years followed by 9.68 from age group 13-14 years. In the post test highest mean knowledge score was 15.28 of subjects in age group 15-16 years followed by 15.08 in age group 13-14 years. The highest 10.28 pretest mean knowledge score was obtained from students of Sikh religion followed by 8.75 from the Hindu, followed by 7.50 from other religions. In post- test highest 15.52 post-test mean knowledge score was obtained from students of Sikh religion followed by 14.16 from the Hindu, followed by 14 from other religions.

The highest 9.85 pretest mean knowledge score was obtained from the students of rural area followed by 8.25 from urban area. In post-test highest 15.35 mean knowledge score was obtained from the students of rural area followed by 13 from urban area.

In term of educational status of father highest pre-test mean knowledge score of 10.66 matriculation, followed by 11 have graduation or above, followed by 9.33 have secondary education, followed by 9.20 have primary education, followed by 6.75 are illiterate. In post-test mean knowledge score the highest 15.60 primary education, followed by 15.50 matriculation, followed by 15 secondary education & graduation or above Followed by 14.25 illiterate.

In term of educational status of mother highest pretest mean knowledge score 11.40 of graduation or above followed by 10.25 have primary education and matriculation, followed by 9.69 have secondary education, followed by 7.30 are illiterate. In post-test mean knowledge score 15.87 of matriculation, followed by15.68 of primary education, followed by 15.15 secondary education, followed by 14.80 graduation or above, followed by 13.90 illiterate.

The highest pre-test mean knowledge score 10.12 had information from friends/family, followed by 9.94 from T.V or Radio, followed by 9.91 from internet, followed by 9.23 from newspaper & magazine. In post-test highest mean technique score 15.33 had information from internet, followed by 15.23 from newspaper & magazine, followed by 15.15 from T.V or radio, followed by 15.12 from the friends/family.

Conclusion

The majority of respondents in pre-test score were (91.67%) in 7-13 i.e. average, in 0-6 (5%) poor and (3.33%) in 14-20 i.e good. Whereas, in post test score the majority of the respondents were (81.67%) in 14-20 score i.e good and (18.33%) in 7-13 score i.e average and no one were scoring 0-6 i.e. Poor. It concludes that post-test knowledge score is higher than pre-test knowledge score. Therefore, the structured teaching programme was effective in enhancing the knowledge regarding prevention of Chikungunya fever among the students of 9th standard.

Conflicts of Interest

All contributing authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Source of Funding

None.

References

1 

S Kamlam Essentials in Community Health Nursing Practice1st Edn.Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers2007http//google.co.in

2 

Guideline for prevention and control of Chikungunya World Health Organization, regional office for south East Asia, New Delhi2008

3 

S Kalantri R Joshi L W Rilley Rilley Chikungunya epidemic an Indian perspectiveNatl Med J India200619631522

4 

A Vidya Arankalle S Shrivastava Genetic divergence of Chikungunya viruses in 2005-2006 explosive epidemic in India Emerg Infect Dis2009607107780

5 

C Lahariya S K Pradhan Emergence of Chikungunya virus in Indian subcontinent after 32 years, a reviewJ Vector Borne Dis200943415160

6 

J Choudhary M Handoudi Grandadam Guidelines on clinical management of Chikungunya feverWHO J200812710568



jats-html.xsl

© This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


  • Article highlights
  • Article tables
  • Article images

Article History

Received : 12-02-2021

Accepted : 24-02-2021

Available online : 25-03-2021


View Article

PDF File   Full Text Article


Downlaod

PDF File   XML File   ePub File


Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

Article DOI

https://doi.org/10.18231/j.ijmpo.2021.004


Article Metrics






Article Access statistics

Viewed: 385

PDF Downloaded: 208



Wiki in hindi